Loved (and blurbed) this book — looking forward to the videos! Backwards Walter Cronkite bodes well.

I love everything about this song, especially the trip down memory lane. I learned all of my French from those skeletons.

Angie Abdou is the author of four books of fiction, including 2011 Canada Reads finalist The Bone Cage (NeWest, 2007). Her most recent novel, Between (Arsenal Pulp, 2014) is about working mothers, Filipina nannies, and swinger resorts. She lives in the Crowsnest Pass and is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Athabasca University.

David Annandale writes Warhammer 40,000 and Horus Heresy fiction for the Black Library, including the recent novels Yarrick: The Pyres of Armageddon and The Damnation of Pythos. He is also the author of the horror novel Gethsemane Hall (Dundurn Press and Snowbooks). For Turnstone Press, he has written a series of thrillers featuring rogue warrior Jen Blaylock (Crown Fire, Kornukopia, and The Valedictorians). His short fiction has appeared in such anthologies as Kaiju Rising: Age of Monsters and Occult Detective Monster Hunter: A Grimoire of Eldritch Inquests. David’s non-fiction has appeared in Black Treacle and such collections as Roman Catholicism in Fantastic Film: Essays on Belief, Spectacle, Ritual and Imagery and The Meaning and Culture of Grand Theft Auto. He writes film reviews for The Phantom of the Movies’ VideoScope. He teaches film, creative writing and literature at the University of Manitoba.

Follow David at his website, www.davidannandale.com, and on Twitter @David_Annandale.

My favourite of David’s novels is Gethsemane Hall (McNally | Amazon), followed closely by The Damnation of Pythos (McNally | Amazon).

ryan fitzpatrick is a poet and critic living in Vancouver. He is the author of two books of poetry: Fortified Castles (Talonbooks, 2014) and Fake Math (Snare, 2007). With Jonathan Ball, he is co-editor of Why Poetry Sucks: An Anthology of Humorous Experimental Canadian Poetry (Insomniac, 2014). With Deanna Fong and Janey Dodd, he works on the second iteration of the Fred Wah Digital Archive, originally spearheaded by Susan Rudy. He is a PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University where he works on contemporary poetics and the social production of space.

Highlighted Pages from Fortified Castles

In the video, Ryan talks about using highlighters in his editing process. Here are a few examples, up close:

More with Ryan on This Site

Two poems from Fortified Castles (McNally | Amazon) in various drafts, so you can compare the early versions with the later versions.

Ryan and I co-edited *Why Poetry Sucks: An Anthology of Humorous Experimental Canadian Poetry.

You can read the introductory essay for Why Poetry Sucks or read a negative review of the book that we also wrote (yes, a negative review of our own book written by us). Ryan also made a few comments as a follow-up in this short video.

Also, check out “Join the Wrinkle Resistance,” a great poem from Ryan’s first book, Fake Math (McNally | Amazon).

And of course, an interview from 2008 about the early stages of Ryan’s Fortified Castles project.

Directed by Jonathan Ball

Written by Jonathan Ball and Patrick Short
Music by Patrick Keenan and Theme by Spoony B & Ugly D

Starring:

Aleksander Rzeszowski as Spoony B
Ken Freund as Snidely S. Cracker
Melissa Best as Loshandra

Proving once again that no Winnipeg Film Group premiere would be complete without a reference to prostitution, Spoony B features the titular pimp (Aleksander Rzeszowski) rescuing his favourite employee from evil villains. Filmmaker Jonathan Ball avoids the usual WFG clichés, though, with the sneaky, inspired notion to combine silent-film melodrama and ’70s pimp-sploitation subject matter, Chaplinesque physical comedy and jive-talking inter-titles.
— Winnipeg Free Press

I had the pleasure of interviewing Natalee Caple about writing titles. Since I met Caple, she has completed a poetry book, The Semiconducting Dictionary (Our Strindberg), a collection of short fiction, How I Came to Haunt My Parents, and a novel, In Calamity’s Wake. I don’t know how she does it, while working and raising a family.

Oh, wait, I do know! She is one of the hardest-working writers around, and one of the most dedicated. Her students at Brock University are some of the luckiest.

Natalee Caple is the author of seven books of poetry and fiction and the co-author of several incarnations of a full-length play titled i-Robot Theatre (based on Jason Christie’s i-Robot Poetry) with the Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre Collective. Her most recent novel, In Calamity’s Wake was published to international acclaim in Canada and the US in 2013. Her collection of poetry, A More Tender Ocean, was shortlisted for the Gerald Lampert Memorial Award. Her book of short stories, The Heart is its Own Reason, was called “moving … arresting” by The New York Times. Her novel, Mackerel Sky was called “ breathlessly good” by the Washington Post. Natalee’s work has been optioned for film, and nominated for a National Magazine Award, the Journey Prize, the Bronwen Wallace Award, and the Eden Mills Fiction Award.