Call for CCWWP Proposals!

I am on the board of CCWWP (Canadian Creative Writers and Writing Programs) and so here is the call for proposals for our next conference!

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Be a Part of Our Conference

Submit your proposal by November 2, 2015

In 2016 CCWWP’s conference programming will be part of a 4-day, multi-organization super-conference held at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto, Ontario. The inaugural Canadian Writers’ Summit (June 15-19, 2016) offers CCWWP participants the opportunity to engage in collaborative intellectual and creative exchanges with other writers and teachers; to explore new issues and topics in research, craft, pedagogy, and the writing life; and to discuss the teaching and learning of creative writing in universities, colleges, and communities.

CCWWP is currently seeking proposals for panel discussions, forums, readings, presentations, and papers, about:

  • the art of writing
  • the pedagogy of teaching writing
  • the business of writing and publishing
  • educational and community programs for writers
  • elements of craft and criticism

CCWWP invites dynamic and innovative approaches to presentations and welcomes moderated panel proposals and/or individual paper proposals that employ critical and creative strategies and forms. Multi-media and collaborative presentations are encouraged.

For more information about our call for proposals, click here.
To submit your proposal, click here.

I’ve turned off the comments on this site.

People don’t seem to comment that much anymore — even when I get over 3,000 readers on an article, I often don’t get a single comment. Everyone wants to connect on social media now.

At the same time, spam is worse than ever. I get over 5,000 spam comments each week. Much of that is caught with various plugins, but more and more is slipping through. I have to deal with probably 20-30 spam comments personally each week. It just seems like a lot of work to maintain something nobody seems to care about.

I will tag all the posts now with an invitation to connect on social media — please do! Like this:

Do you miss the comments? Let me know on Twitter or Facebook, or send me an e-mail — and if you haven’t already, join my mailing list and keep in touch.

#95books for 2015 (The First 40)

Once again in 2015, I am reading #95books. As May begins, I hit book 40, so I thought I might check-in with my list-in-progress:

  1. Moby-Dick (Herman Melville)
  2. Idaho Winter (Tony Burgess)
  3. Girlwood (Jennifer Still)
  4. Infinitum (G.M.B. Chomichuk)
  5. Their Biography (kevin mcpherson eckhoff)
  6. The Troop (Nick Cutter)
  7. Thou (Aisha Sasha John)
  8. Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free (Cory Doctorow)
  9. Magpie Days (Brenda Sciberras)
  10. Galveston (Nic Pizzolatto)
  11. The King in Yellow (Robert W. Chambers)
  12. The Imagination Manifesto, vol. 3 (GMB Chomichuk & John Toone)
  13. Cassie and Tonk (Justin Currie, GMB Chomichuk, & Will Liddle)
  14. Wraith (Joe Hill & Charles Paul Wilson III)
  15. Multiple Bippies (Colin Smith)
  16. The Gun That Starts the Race (Peter Norman)
  17. Imagine: How Creativity Works (Jonah Lehrer)
  18. Through the Woods (Emily Carroll)
  19. Corked (Catriona Strang)
  20. Afterlife with Archie, Book 1 (Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa & Francesco Francavilla)
  21. Red Curls (Tracy Hamon)
  22. The Pet Radish, Shrunken (Pearl Pirie)
  23. The Damnation of Pythos (David Annandale)
  24. The Deep (Nick Cutter)
  25. The Ocean at the End of the Lane (Neil Gaiman)
  26. On Evil (Terry Eagleton)
  27. Boycott (Gregory Betts)
  28. Loitersack (Donato Mancini)
  29. A New Index for Predicting Catastrophes (Madhur Anand)
  30. Dear Leader (Damian Rogers)
  31. The Blondes (Emily Schultz)
  32. The War of Art (Steven Pressfield)
  33. Mephiston: Lord of Death (David Annandale)
  34. B (Sarah Kay)
  35. The Purpose Pitch (Kathryn Mockler)
  36. The Lake and the Library (S. M. Beiko)
  37. mcv (Melker Garay)
  38. Asbestos Heights (David McGimpsey)
  39. Asbestos Heights (David McGimpsey)
  40. Merz Structure No. 2 Burnt by Children at Play (Jake Kennedy)

John Paizs’s Crime Wave shortlisted for a Manitoba Book Award!

Startled and thrilled to be nominated for a Manitoba Book Award! John Paizs’s Crime Wave (U of Toronto P, 2014) is shortlisted for the Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award/ Prix littéraire Carol-Shields de la ville de Winnipeg. Always thrilled to draw more attention toward this wonderful film.

Congratulations to all of the shortlisted authors (here’s the full list):

 

Alexander Kennedy Isbister Award for Non-Fiction/ Prix Alexander-Kennedy-Isbister pour les études et essais
Detachment: An Adoption Memoir by Maurice Mierau, published by Freehand Books

Indigenous Women, Work, and History: 1940–1980 by Mary Jane Logan McCallum, published by University of Manitoba Press

The Patriotic Consensus: Unity, Morale, and the Second World War in Winnipeg by Jody Perrun, published by University of Manitoba Press

The Showman and the The Ukrainian Cause: Folk Dance, Film, and the Life of Vasile Avramenko by Orest T. Martynowych, published by University of Manitoba Press

Toronto: Biography of a City by Allan Levine, published by Douglas & McIntyre

Beatrice Mosionier Aboriginal Writer of the Year Award / Prix Beatrice-Mosionier pour l’écrivain/e autochtone de l’année

Deborah L. Delaronde

David Alexander Robertson

Katherena Vermette

Carol Shields Winnipeg Book Award/ Prix littéraire Carol-Shields de la ville de Winnipeg

Barker by Wayne Tefs, published by Turnstone Press

John Paizs’s Crime Wave by Jonathan Ball, published by University of Toronto Press

The Opening Sky by Joan Thomas, published by McClelland & Stewart

The Patriotic Consensus: Unity, Morale, and the Second World War in Winnipeg by Jody Perrun, published by University of Manitoba Press

Put on the Armour of Light by Catherine Macdonald, published by Dundurn Press

The Chris Johnson Award for Best Play by a Manitoba Playwright / Prix Chris-Johnson pour la meilleure pièce par un dramaturge manitobain

Fort Mac, by Marc Prescott, published by Les Éditions du Blé, Winnipeg

Sargent & Victor & Me by Deborah Patterson, produced by Theatre Projects Manitoba

The Miser of Middlegate by Carolyn Gray, published by Scirocco Drama, an imprint of J. Gordon Shillingford Publishing

The Secret Mask by Rick Chafe, published by Playwrights Canada Press, Toronto

Eileen McTavish Sykes Award for Best First Book

Indigenous Women, Work, and History by Mary Jane Logan McCallum, published by University of Manitoba Press

Magpie Days by Brenda Sciberras, published by Turnstone Press

The Patriotic Consensus by Jody Perrun, published by University of Manitoba Press

What Lies Behind by Luann Hiebert, published by Turnstone Press

John Hirsch Award for Most Promising Manitoba Writer / Prix John-Hirsch pour l’écrivain manitobain le plus prometteur

MC Joudrey

David Alexander Robertson

Brenda Sciberras

Lansdowne Prize for Poetry / Prix Lansdowne de poésie

De l’amuïssement des certitudes by Laurent Poliquin, published by Jacques André Editeur

In the Tiger Park by Alison Calder, published by Coteau Books

Stowaways by Ariel Gordon, published by Palimpsest Press

What Lies Behind by Luann Hiebert, published by Turnstone Press

Le Prix littéraire Rue-Deschambault

Confessions sans pénitence par Lise Gaboury-Diallo avec illustrations de Denis Devigne, publié par Les Éditions du Blé

De l’amuïssement des certitudes par Laurent Poliquin, publié par Jacques André éditeur

Jean Riel, fils de Louis Riel : sous une mauvaise étoile par Annette Saint-Pierre, publié par Les Éditions du Blé

soubresauts par Charles Leblanc, publié par Les Éditions du Blé

Un vent prodigue par Simone Chaput, publié par Leméac

Manuela Dias Book Design and Illustration Awards/ Prix Manuela-Dias de conception graphique et d’illustration en édition

Design Category (emphasis on cover design and typography):

Devil in Deerskins: My Life with Grey Owl by Anahareo, edited and with an afterword by Sophie McCall, published by University of Manitoba Press, cover design by Mike Carroll, interior design by Jessica Koroscil

Kraken Bake: An Epikurean Epic by Karen Dudley, published by Ravenstone, an imprint of Turnstone Press, cover and interior design by Jamis Paulson

Text Me / Dimmelo per SMS by Corrado Calabrò, translated by Genni Gunn, published by Signature Editions, cover and interior design by Terry Gallagher of Doowah Design

Children’s Books/Graphic Novels Category:

Cassie and Tonk, created and illustrated by Justin Currie, written by GMB Chomichuk, robotic reference by Will Liddle, published by Chasing Artwork

The Chair by the Side of the Road
by Adrian Hawaleshka, self-published/Friesen Press, illustrated by Natasha Boone

The Peacemaker: Thanadelthur (Tales from Big Spirit Series)
by David Alexander Robertson, published by HighWater Press (an imprint of Portage & Main Press), design by Relish New Brand Experience, illustrated by Wai Tien

General Illustration Category:

City Beautiful: How Architecture Shaped Winnipeg’s DNA by Randy Turner, art director Gordon Preece, published by the Winnipeg Free Press

Exploring Old Highway No. 1 West: Canada’s Route 66 by J. Clark Saunders, design by Bergdís Sigurðardóttir, maps by Dawn Huck, published by Heartland Associates

Warehouse Journal Volume 23, edited and designed by Liane Lanzar and Kevin Complido, published by University of Manitoba Faculty of Architecture

Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction

Blue Vengeance by Alison Preston, published by Signature Editions

The Evolution of Alice by David A. Robertson, published by HighWater Press, an imprint of Portage & Main Press

Kraken Bake: An Epikurean Epic by Karen Dudley, published by Ravenstone, an imprint of Turnstone Press

Leaving Tomorrow by David Bergen, published by HarperCollins Publishers Ltd.

Mr. Jones by Margaret Sweatman, published by Goose Lane Editions

The Opening Sky by Joan Thomas, published by McClelland & Stewart

Mary Scorer Award for Best Book by a Manitoba Publisher/ Prix Mary-Scorer pour le meilleur livre par un éditeur du Manitoba

Boy Lost in Wild by Brenda Hasiuk, published by Turnstone Press

Kraken Bake: An Epikurean Epic by Karen Dudley, published by Ravenstone, an imprint of Turnstone Press

Jean Riel, fils de Louis Riel : sous une mauvaise étoile par Annette Saint-Pierre, publié par Les Éditions du Blé

Sanaaq: An Inuit Novel by Mitiarjuk Nappaaluk, transliterated and translated by Bernard Saladin d’Anglure, translated from French by Peter Frost, published by University of Manitoba Press

The Winter We Danced: Voices from the Past, the Future, and the Idle No More Movement, edited by The Kino-nda-niimi Collective, published by ARP Books

McNally Robinson Books for Young People Awards

Younger category

The Chair by the Side of the Road by Adrian Hawaleshka, self-published/Friesen Press

The Firewalker by Shezza Ansloos, published by Pemmican Publications

Hokey Dowa Gerda and the Snowflake Girl by M.J. Matheson, published by Peanut Butter Press

Mr. Jacobson’s Window by Deborah Froese, published by Peanut Butter Press

Princess by Dennis Fast, published by Heartland Associates

Older category

Empty Cup by Suzanne Costigan, published by Rebelight Publishing

Missing in Paradise by Larry Verstraete, published by Rebelight Publishing

Tucson Jo by Carol Matas, published by Fictive Press

The World Outside by Eva Wiseman, published by Tundra Books

Your Constant Star by Brenda Hasiuk, published by Orca Book Publishers

McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award

Detachment by Maurice Mierau, published by Freehand Books

Leaving Tomorrow by David Bergen, published by HarperCollins Publishers Ltd

Mr. Jones by Margaret Sweatman, published by Goose Lane Editions

The Opening Sky by Joan Thomas, published by McClelland & Stewart

Toronto by Allan Levine, published by Douglas & McIntyre

SALE on The Politics of Knives

Throughout February, I’m selling The Politics of Knives — my only award-winning book! — for a mere $7.

“The Politics of Knives marks Jonathan Ball as a talent already here in a big way. Read it.” — Douglas Barbour

“If Jonathan Ball’s previous book of poems Clockfire was a book about the horrors of the theatre, The Politics of Knives, his most recent, is about the horrors of film. Using the cut as an organizing device, Ball interrogates the way we organize our everyday (and not so everyday) narratives: how we surveil and are surveilled, what we include and exclude from our cinematic and psychological frames, and what it means to wait for the next reel to start. Caught between filmic edit and horrific cuts in reality, Ball asks whether the imagined film of our lives isn’t already a scary one.” — Ryan Fitzpatrick

“The violence in The Politics of Knives is often directed at the text itself. Many passages exploit a syntactical ambiguity to set up one meaning while at the same time subverting another, so the reader never knows which word might turn traitor.” — Jeremy Colangelo

Should smoking in movies receive an 18A rating?

On the Charles Adler show again (AM 680 CJOB in Winnipeg) to talk with Brenda Austin-Smith about a push in Ontario to give films that feature tobacco use an “18A” rating.

“When Guy Maddin wins an Oscar, then I’ll start caring who wins Oscars.”

Charles Adler was nice enough to invite me on his CJOB radio show to discuss the Academy Awards — a mistake he will never make again! Things heat up around 5:40. Always fun to chat with the fine folks at CJOB!